Broccoli and Malignancy

There is a saying that contrarily to  cabbages,  broccolis went to grad school.  Along the way, they picked up quite a baggage of therapeutic punch, including but not limited to anti-cancer phyto nutrients.
Nutritional science evidenced  that broccoli veggies are safe and efficient at preventing and treating several types of cancer.  To this end, scientific researchers  have shown the following:
“The ITCs ( isothiocyanates) induce Phase II enzymes related to detoxification processes of chemical carcinogens to prevent the start of carcinogenesis. They also exhibit antitumor activity at post-initiation phase, suggesting their additional role(s) in cancer prevention. Sulforaphane is the most extensively studied isothiocyanate, focused in its anti-tumoral activity….(….) In a dose dependent manner, ITCs inhibit the cell viability of human cervical cancer cells, human pancreatic cancer cells, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, human ovarian cancer cells, and have antiinflammatory properties in the treatment of human T-cell leukemia cells” (Exhibit A, below)
In addition, a piece of epidemiological evidence published in the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention in 2013 also confirmed broccoli’s anti-cancer benefits:
“Epidemiological evidence strongly suggests that consumption of dietary phytochemicals found in vegetables and fruit can decrease cancer incidence. Among the various vegetables, broccoli and other cruciferous species appear most closely associated with reduced cancer risk in organs such as the colorectum, lung, prostate and breast. The protecting effects against cancer risk have been attributed, at least partly, due to their comparatively high amounts of glucosinolates, which differentiate them from other vegetables. Glucosinolates, a class of sulphur- containing glycosides, present at substantial amounts in cruciferous vegetables, and their breakdown products such as the isothiocyanates, are believed to be responsible for their health benefits (Exhibit B, see below).
Futhermore, broccoli can help in the pulmonary detoxification process. A study published in Clinical Immunology in March 2009 found that sulforaphane  (a molecule found within isothiocyanates)  can protect us from respiratory inflammation that leads to asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other common respiratory conditions. According to the study, the sulforaphane increased the production of antioxidant enzymes in human subjects, thereby guarding them from excessive free radical exposure associated with inhaling polluted air, vehicle fumes and cigarette smoke. (Source)  These results suggest that regular consumption of broccoli — which is one of the greatest natural sources of sulforaphane — can help protect us from environmental toxins. Broccoli veggies are best consumed raw since heat interferes with the enzyme that releases isothiocyanates.  (Source). Organic  broccoli sprouts are the best of the best in this realm.

broccoliCRok

Photo Attribution:   Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.
EXHIBIT A
Recent Pat Endocr Metab Immune Drug Discov. 2013 Sep;7(3):213-25.
The anti-oxidant properties of isothiocyanates: a review.
de Figueiredo SM1, Filho SA, Nogueira-Machado JA, Caligiorne RB.

Abstract

Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and watercress, have been studied extensively aiming to evaluate their chemopreventive properties. Some of them have already been established using animal models. The ITCs induce Phase II enzymes related to detoxification processes of chemical carcinogens to prevent the start of carcinogenesis. They also exhibit antitumor activity at post-initiation phase, suggesting their additional role(s) in cancer prevention. Sulforaphane is the most extensively studied isothiocyanate, focused in its anti-tumoral activity and it is mainly found in great amounts in broccoli and other cruciferous. In a dose dependent manner, ITCs inhibit the cell viability of human cervical cancer cells, human pancreatic cancer cells, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, human ovarian cancer cells, and have antiinflammatory properties in the treatment of human T-cell leukemia cells. This protective effect may be due to improved antioxidant status. Although the health effects of diet in humans are generally considered promising, there are definite challenges and limitations of the current data in better understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect, together with the possible interactions between different dietary constituents. The survey of relevant patents on the use of isothiocyanates such as sulforaphane for cancer and cardiovascular diseases treatments is also included in this review.
EXHIBIT B
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2013;14(3):1565-70.
Cruciferous vegetables: dietary phytochemicals for cancer prevention.
Abdull Razis AF1, Noor NM.

Abstract

Relationships between diet and health have attracted attention for centuries; but links between diet and cancer have been a focus only in recent decades. The consumption of diet-containing carcinogens, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic amines is most closely correlated with increasing cancer risk. Epidemiological evidence strongly suggests that consumption of dietary phytochemicals found in vegetables and fruit can decrease cancer incidence. Among the various vegetables, broccoli and other cruciferous species appear most closely associated with reduced cancer risk in organs such as the colorectum, lung, prostate and breast. The protecting effects against cancer risk have been attributed, at least partly, due to their comparatively high amounts of glucosinolates, which differentiate them from other vegetables. Glucosinolates, a class of sulphur- containing glycosides, present at substantial amounts in cruciferous vegetables, and their breakdown products such as the isothiocyanates, are believed to be responsible for their health benefits. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the chemopreventive effect of these compounds are likely to be manifold, possibly concerning very complex interactions, and thus difficult to fully understand. Therefore, this article provides a brief overview about the mechanism of such compounds involved in modulation of carcinogen metabolising enzyme systems.

Holistic Oncology Movie’s Founder, Christian Joubert has worked as a professor of public law and holistic medicine for most of his adult life, in association with his activities in organic agriculture. Christian’s has attained expertise in many fields, thanks to which he can help as many people as possible, including, but not limited to biogerontology, (ie, extending healthy human life-spans to over 120 years old), holistic oncology, traditional naturopathy (or what is also called “natural medicine”, coming from Hippocratic Tradition), French medicine, (classified by the W.H.O. as the number one out of in 191 countries, Cf. the link “about”), comparative public policy and international public law. Trained in conventional medicine, acupuncture, naturopathy, oenology, the social sciences and law in France, Christian has campaigned and litigated in Courts of law for multiple years in order to replace outdated medical standards of care with evidence-based holistic standards. His originality is based on being able to examine medicine and the health sciences with legal & forensic eyes, thanks to which he can distinguish the relevant data from the irrelevant. In addition, his broad knowledge relative to the health sciences, organic farming, ecology, eco-development, oenology (wine science), sociology, political science, the law and different cultures allows him to identify those key inter-connections that too often, most family members, medical doctors, professors of medicine and public health experts are not able to see or understand. To benefit in vivo from Christian’s trans-cultural, medical, legal and inter-disciplinary training and experience, click the Consult link in the top menu bar.

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One comment on “Broccoli and Malignancy
  1. holistic says:

    As early as in the October 1996, the Journal of the American Dietetic Association showed that 70% or more of the studies found a link between cruciferous vegetables and protection against cancer. As noted, there are different components in cruciferous vegetables have been linked to lower cancer risks. Some have shown the ability to stop the growth of cancer cells for tumors in the breast, uterine lining, lung, colon, liver, and cervix, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research. And studies that track the diets of people over time have found that diets high in cruciferous vegetables are linked to lower rates of prostate cancer. Among others, one component that helps to set these vegetables apart from others are their sulfur-containing compounds called glucosinolates, which not only give them their distinctive smell, but also their health-promoting benefits. Glucosinolates can help prevent cancer by assisting the body in ridding itself of carcinogens or by protecting normal cells from transforming into cancer cells.

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